Uganda

Turning the Camera Back: A Photovoice Project With Ugandan Children Who Are Orphaned and Living With HIV

By Bonnie Fournier, Andrea Bridge, Judy Mill, Arif Alibhai, Andrea Pritchard Kennedy, and Joseph Konde-Lule

In SAGE Open, Vol. 4, No. 2 (April–June 2014) doi:10.1177/2158244014530997

Abstract:

Move together now: Community and youth mobilisation for HIV prevention among young people in Uganda

Resource: 

Alternate link to the PDF

This guide aims to equip users with the knowledge, attitudes and skills to build the capacity of communities and young people to work together to address the sexual and reproductive health (SRH), including HIV, needs of young people. The guide will help you to work in participatory ways with young people, and the adults who influence their lives, at all stages of the community mobilization process to:

The World Starts With Me: A multilevel evaluation of a comprehensive sex education programme targeting adolescents in Uganda

Alternate link to the provisional PDF

This 2011 paper evaluates the effect of the World Starts With Me (WSWM), a comprehensive sex education programme in secondary schools in Uganda. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of WSWM on socio-cognitive determinants of safe sex behaviour (delay; condom use and non-coercive sex).

WSWM was first introduced in 30 secondary schools in Uganda in September 2003

Improving the Lives of Vulnerable Children: Implications of Horizons Research Among Orphans and Other Children Affected by AIDS

From 1997 through 2007, the Horizons program conducted research to inform the care and support of children who had been orphaned and rendered vulnerable by AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Horizons conducted studies in Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Uganda, Zambia,
and Zimbabwe. Horizons researchers developed tools to assess the psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV and outlined key ethical guidelines for conducting research among children.

Let Art Talk brochure

The Let Art Talk organization was launched in 2007 as an innovative and unique way to address important issues facing Uganda and the global community. Let Art Talk hosts artists and students from different parts of Uganda. The running of workshops on how to use various art methods and the creation of talking murals are two main initiatives of this organization.

Syndicate content